Category:Finn Cycle

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  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • URARD MAC COISE (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • A Oisín, is fada do shúan
  • verse
  • (39 st.; 167 st.)
  • beg. A Oisín, as fada do shúan
  • (part of/cited in Duanaire Finn, Agallamh Oisín agus Phádraig)
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Dialogue
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Oisín mac Finn

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

A prosimetric narrative, related to Acallam na senórach, concerning the wanderngs of Caílte and other survivors of the Fían at the time of Patrick’s advent in Ireland. While the dialogue between Patrick and a representative of Finn’s old fían is central to both Acallam na senórach and the later Agallamh na seanórach, the meeting between Patrick and Caílte occupies comparatively little space in this text.
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

The Agallamh Oisín agus Phádraig, as intended here, refers to a series of poems that have been brought together in the framework of a dialogue between St Patrick and Finn's son Oisín.
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

A composite recension of the tale of the conversation (agallamh) between St Patrick and representatives of the old Fían, Oisín and Caílte.
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Finn Cycle

Fragment of a text relating a version of the story of Finn's death. Finn is said to have died in old age while attempting to leap the River Boyne over a place called Léimm (Find). His body is discovered by Aiclech, son of Dub Drenn, and the three sons of Urgriu. Aiclech severs the head and for this act, he is slain by his three companions.
  • Middle Irish
  • Old Irish
  • Finn Cycle
  • Death of Finn mac Cumaill
  • Boyne
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

Fragment of a text relating a version of the story of the Finn's death.
  • Finn Cycle
  • Death of Finn mac Cumaill
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

  • Middle Irish
  • Finn Cycle
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas prose text on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare)
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Almu

  • Dinnshenchas of Almu I
  • verse
  • beg. Almu Lagen, les na Fían
  • (part of/cited in Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Acallam na senórach/Ráith Glais and Ráith Almu, Fotha catha Cnucha)
Dinnshenchas poem on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare), which recounts the tale of the conception of Finn mac Cumaill.
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • conception
  • Almu
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

Dinnshenchas poem on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare)
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Iuchna
  • Almu (wife of Iuchna)
  • Beccán (father of Almu)
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Clann Bresail
  • Almu

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas of Áth Líac Find
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

Tract on the dinnshenchas of Áth Líac Find, a ford of the Shannon.
  • MÁEL MURU OTHNA
  • MÁEL MURU OTHNA (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Sinand ingen Mongáin
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Gúaire Goll
  • Áth Líac Find

The title Banshenchas refers to two versions composed in the late Middle Irish period:
  1. a metrical version composed by Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside in 1147 and
  2. a longer version in prose.
Follow the links for further references.
  • Middle Irish
  • lists of people
  • Irish legendary history
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Finn Cycle
  • Mythological Cycle
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Early Irish poetry

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Finn Cycle

Late Gaelic prose romance in the form of a so-called bruidhean tale about Fionn mac Cumhaill and his men, perhaps composed in the 15th or 16th century. In the story, Fionn and a number of companions are entrapped in a sinister enchanted hostel or bruidhean by Míodhach (Midac), son of Colgán (Colga), king of Lochlann. Míodhach was taken up and reared by the Fían after his father was killed in an unsuccesful attempt to seize Irish territory, but on coming of age, plotted revenge and so invited Fionn to a feast at ‘The hostel of rowan’ on the Shannon. Once inside, Fionn and his men find themselves magically glued to their seats, awaiting death by decapitation, while Míodhach is making foreign allies. They chant a dord fían (a low kind of humming), which reveals their whereabouts to the remaining members of the Fían, including Oisín, Caoilte, Innse, and Diarmuid. A series of fights ensues in which the latter resist foreign attackers and kill Míodhach. Diarmuid slays the kings of Inis Tuile (Thule) and uses their blood to release Fionn and the other captured men from the spell of enchantment (although Conán Maol does not come away without being partially skinned alive). Finally, a great battle is fought and won over the ‘King of the world’, who is defeated and beheaded.
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Finn Cycle
  • Rí an Domhain
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Caílte mac Rónáin
  • Oisín mac Finn
  • Oscar mac Oisín
  • Díarmait úa Duibne
  • Conán (Mael) mac Morna
  • Mídach mac Colgáin
  • Colgán ... king of Lochlann
  • Lochlann
  • Inis Tuile

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Caoineadh Áille Shnuagheal
  • (91 st.)
  • beg. A Mheargaigh (chruaidh) na nglas-lann (ngéar)
  • (part of/cited in Agallamh Oisín agus Phádraig)
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Late Middle Irish account of the battle of Crinna, in which Cormac mac Airt is said to have defeated the Ulstermen with the aid of Tadg son of Cían. The saga offers an origin legend of the Cíannacht Breg, explaining how it came to settle near Tara but did not attain the kingship of Tara.
  • Middle Irish
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Finn Cycle
  • Cíannacht Breg
  • Cíannachta
  • Tadg mac Céin

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Finn Cycle

A prose anecdote on matter of the Finn Cycle, which mentions Oisín son of Finn.
  • Finn Cycle
  • Oisín mac Finn

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Dinnshenchas of Cenn Cuirrig
  • verse
  • beg. Currech Life cona Lí
  • (part of/cited in Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn C, Bruiden Átha Í)
Dinnshenchas of Cenn Cuirrig
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas of Cenn Finichair
  • FINN MAC CUMAILL (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Cenn Finichair
  • Tamnach
  • Finichair mac Golláin
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Cotail becán becán bec
  • verse
  • (15 st.)
  • beg. Codail begán begán beg; Cotail becán, becán bec
  • (part of/cited in Duanaire Finn)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle


FURTHER RESULTS…

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • URARD MAC COISE (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • A Oisín, is fada do shúan
  • verse
  • (39 st.; 167 st.)
  • beg. A Oisín, as fada do shúan
  • (part of/cited in Duanaire Finn, Agallamh Oisín agus Phádraig)
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Dialogue
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Oisín mac Finn

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

A prosimetric narrative, related to Acallam na senórach, concerning the wanderngs of Caílte and other survivors of the Fían at the time of Patrick’s advent in Ireland. While the dialogue between Patrick and a representative of Finn’s old fían is central to both Acallam na senórach and the later Agallamh na seanórach, the meeting between Patrick and Caílte occupies comparatively little space in this text.
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

The Agallamh Oisín agus Phádraig, as intended here, refers to a series of poems that have been brought together in the framework of a dialogue between St Patrick and Finn's son Oisín.
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

A composite recension of the tale of the conversation (agallamh) between St Patrick and representatives of the old Fían, Oisín and Caílte.
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Dinnshenchas of Almu I
  • verse
  • beg. Almu Lagen, les na Fían
  • (part of/cited in Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Acallam na senórach/Ráith Glais and Ráith Almu, Fotha catha Cnucha)
Dinnshenchas poem on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare), which recounts the tale of the conception of Finn mac Cumaill.
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • conception
  • Almu
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

Dinnshenchas poem on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare)
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Iuchna
  • Almu (wife of Iuchna)
  • Beccán (father of Almu)
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Clann Bresail
  • Almu

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

Tract on the dinnshenchas of Áth Líac Find, a ford of the Shannon.
  • MÁEL MURU OTHNA
  • MÁEL MURU OTHNA (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Sinand ingen Mongáin
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Gúaire Goll
  • Áth Líac Find

The title Banshenchas refers to two versions composed in the late Middle Irish period:
  1. a metrical version composed by Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside in 1147 and
  2. a longer version in prose.
Follow the links for further references.
  • Middle Irish
  • lists of people
  • Irish legendary history
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Finn Cycle
  • Mythological Cycle
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Early Irish poetry

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Dinnshenchas of Cenn Cuirrig
  • verse
  • beg. Currech Life cona Lí
  • (part of/cited in Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn C, Bruiden Átha Í)
Dinnshenchas of Cenn Cuirrig
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas of Cenn Finichair
  • FINN MAC CUMAILL (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Cenn Finichair
  • Tamnach
  • Finichair mac Golláin
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Cotail becán becán bec
  • verse
  • (15 st.)
  • beg. Codail begán begán beg; Cotail becán, becán bec
  • (part of/cited in Duanaire Finn)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Pages using duplicate arguments in template calls

  • Dám thrír táncatar ille
  • verse
  • beg. Dám thrír táncatar ille
  • (part of/cited in Independent, Acallam bec, Agallamh na seanórach)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas of Descert, possibly Descert Laigen
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas of Druim nDairbrech
  • FULARTACH (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Eirigh suas a Oscair
  • verse
  • (6 st.)
  • beg. Eirigh súas, a Oscair
  • (part of/cited in Duanaire Finn, Acallam na senórach, Acallam na senórach/The story of Oscar's first battle)
  • Middle Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Fil duine
  • beg. Fil duine
  • (part of/cited in Commentary on the Amra Choluim Chille)
  • Old Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Dinnshenchas of Fornocht
  • verse
  • beg. Fornocht do dún, a Druim nDen
  • (part of/cited in Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn C)
Dinnshenchas of Fornocht, formerly Druim Den.
  • FIND (ascr.)
  • FINN MAC CUMAILL (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Fornocht ... Forenaghts, Co. Kildare

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Late Middle Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Géisid cúan
  • verse
  • beg. Géisid cúan
  • (part of/cited in Acallam na senórach)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Text on the dinnshenchas of Glaisse Bulga
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle
  • Glas ingen Deirg meic Dedad
  • Derg mac Dedad
  • Oscar mac Oisín
  • Glaise Bulgáin

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • La da raibh Fionn ag ol
  • verse
  • (19 st.; 127 st.)
  • beg. La da raibh Fionn ag ol
  • (part of/cited in Independent, Duanaire Finn, Agallamh Oisín agus Phádraig)
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Lige Guill
  • verse
  • beg. Derg ruathar cloinne Morna
  • (part of/cited in Duanaire Finn)
  • Middle Irish
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Story in which Finn mac Cumaill and his servant Mac Lesc mac Ladáin are separated from the Fían. A number of verses are exchanged (cf. ‘Fuitt co bráth’).
  • Middle Irish
  • Finn Cycle
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Mac Lesc mac Ladáin

Dinnshenchas of Mag Dá Gési (Mag Dá Géise)
  • FINN MAC CUMAILL (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Mag Dá Gési

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

Two quatrains alluding to a story about the birth of Oisín.
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle
  • Oisín mac Finn

Metrical version of the Banshenchas, composed by Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside (1147)
  • ÚA CAISIDE (GILLA MO DUTU)
  • ÚA CAISIDE (GILLA MO DUTU) (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • lists of people
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Finn Cycle
  • Irish legendary history
  • Mythological Cycle
  • Ulster Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Seven quatrains attributed to Oisín, on the battle of Gabair Aichle.
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

Prose version of the Banshenchas
  • Middle Irish
  • lists of people
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle
  • Irish legendary history
  • Mythological Cycle
  • Ulster Cycle

  • Old Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

Old Irish poem, with later prose introduction.
  • Old Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle
  • The Morrígan

Four quatrains ascribed to Oisín in his old age.
  • OISÍN MAC FINN (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

A single quatrain alluding to a story about the death of Finn mac Cumaill.
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle
  • Death of Finn mac Cumaill
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

Dinnshenchas of Róiriu in Uí Failge (Róiriu i nUíb Failge)
  • FIND ... UNIDENTIFIED (ascr.)
  • FINN MAC CUMAILL (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

Dinnshenchas of Róiriu in in Uí Muiredaig (Róiriu i nUíb Muiredaig)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

Prose tract and poem giving two versions of the dinnshenchas of Snám Dá Én. The first story also explains the origin of the names of Áth Lúain, Móin Tíre Náir and Mag nEstin.
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Snám Dá Én
  • Áth Lúain
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)

Text on the dinnshenchas of Tipra Sengarmna
  • FERGUS FINNBÉL (ascr.)
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle

A ballad about a tragic event and its aftermath in Fenian tradition. It relates how Garad mac Morna burnt to death the wives of the fían-warriors in Finn's house and how he was afterwards slain by his son Aod.
  • Finn Cycle
  • Garad mac Morna
  • Finn mac Cumaill (Find úa Báiscni)
  • Ailbe ingen Chormaic
  • Áed mac Garaid

Poem on the dinnshenchas of Tond Clidna, attributed to Caílte.
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Finn Cycle
  • Clidna
  • Tonn Chlidna

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Classical Irish poetry
  • Duanaire Finn
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle

  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish lyrics
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Finn Cycle


FURTHER RESULTS…

Meyer’s list of fíanaigecht

The list below gives a succinct overview of the survey compiled by Kuno Meyer in the introduction to his Fianaigecht (1910). It focuses on the earliest texts and textual fragments relating to Finn and his fían. For issues with Meyer’s suggestions regarding the dates of composition (given below), see especially Kevin Murray, ‘Interpreting the evidence: problems with dating the early fíanaigecht corpus’ in The Gaelic Finn tradition... (2012).

Seventh century
i. Poem ascribed to Senchán Torpéist, beginning ‘Find Taulcha tuath cuire Cailte’
* Na trí Fothaid
Eighth century
ii. The quarrel between Finn and Oisín
iii. Finn and the man in the tree
iv. Reicne Fothaid Canainne
Ninth century
v. Tucait fagbála in fessa do Finn ⁊ marbad Cuil Duib
vi. Bruiden Atha Í
vii. Finn and the jester Lomnae
viii. Entry ‘rincne’ in Sanas Cormaic
ix. Áth Liac Find, cid dia tá?’ (First recension)
x. Poem ascribed to Flannacán mac Cellaig, beginning ‘Innid scél scaílter n-airich
xi. Scél asa mberar co mbad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán ocus aní dia fíl aided Fothaid Airgdig
Tenth century
xii. Triad § 236‎ of the Trecheng Breth Féne
xiii. (a) Poem by Cináed ua hArtacáin, beginning ‘Án sin, a maig Meic ind Óc
(b) Poem by Cináed ua hArtacáin, beginning ‘Fianna bátar i nEmain
xiv. (a) ‘Almu Lagen, les na Fían
(b) ‘Almu robo cháem dia cois
xv. Fornocht do dún, a Druim nDen’, attributed to Finn
xvi. Sund dessid domunemar
xvii. Tipra Sen-Garmna fo a snas
xviii. Finn and Gráinne
xix. Echtra Finn, containing a prose version of Finn and the phantoms
xx. Echta Lagen for Leth Cuind
xxi. (a) Poem beginning ‘Scél lem dúib’, found in the commentary to Amra Choluim Chille
(b) Poem beginning ‘Cétamon’, embedded within the Macgnímartha Find
xxii. Poem ascribed to Urard mac Coise, beginning ‘A Mór Maigne Moigi Siúil
xxiii. Tochmarc Ailbe
xxiv. Aithed Gráinne’, title in medieval Irish tale lists
xxv. Úath Beinne Étair
xxvi. ‘Uath Dercce Ferna’, known from the tale lists, but presumed lost)
xxvii. (a) Aided Find (Egerton 92 fragment)
{b) a single quatrain preserved in LL, beginning ‘Rodíchned Find, ba fer tend
Eleventh century
xxviii. Dindsenchas poem beginning ‘Atá sund Carn uí Chathbath’ ascribed to Cuán ua Lothcháin (d. 1024)
xxix. Mittelirische Verslehren II (last section), treatise on Irish metrics
xxx. Fotha Catha Cnucha
xxxi. Poem beginning ‘Oenach indiu luid in rí
xxxii. Marginal poem (two quatrains only) beginning ‘Máthair Díarmata ón dáil’ (LL 164)
xxxiii. Gloss to Félire Óengusso
xxxiv. Scél na Fír Flatha, Echtra Cormaic i Tír Tairngiri, ⁊ Ceart Claidib Cormaic
xxxv. Annálad anall uile’, ascribed to Gilla Cóemáin
xxxvi. Annals of Tigernach, s.a. 283
Twelfth century
xxxvii. Tesmolta Cormaic
xxxviii. The Bóroma (including two poems in LL)
xxxix.

Prose Dindsenchas:
(a) Fornocht § 26 (death of Uinche Ochurbél);
(b) Ráith Cnámrossa § 31
(c) Tipra Sengarman § 52.
{d) Áth Liac Find § 139

xl. Poem beginning ‘Dám thrír táncatar ille
xli. Poem beginning ‘Is de sin atá Áth Lúain’, on the dindsenchas of Snám Dá Én
xlii. Poem attributed to Finn on the dindsenchas of Róiriu i nHúib Failge, beginning ‘Nímutanic ó thír thend
xliii. Macgnímartha Finn
xliv. Poem ascribed to Oisín, beginning ‘Ro loiscit na lama sa
xlv. Episode in a poem ascribed to Gilla in Chomded húa Cormaic, beginning ‘A Rí richid, réidig dam
xlvi. Banshenchas, poetic version ascribed to Gilla Mo-Dutu Ó Caiside
xlvii. Banshenchas, prose version
xlviii. Mac Lesc mac Ladáin aithech
xlix. Poem attributed to Finn beginning ‘In lia no theilginn do grés’: on the dindsenchas of Mag Dá Géise
l. Poem beginning ‘Ogam il-lia, lia uas lecht’, on the battle of Gabair Aichle
li. Poem ascribed to Oisín, beginning ‘Tuilsitir mo derca súain’ (on the boar of Muir Talláin)
lii. Poem ascribed to Caílte, beginning ‘Bec innocht lúth mo dá lúa
liii. Poem ascribed to Oisín, on the conversion of the fíana, beginning ‘Ochtur táncamar anuas
liv. Poem attributed to Caílte on the dindsenchas of Tonn Clidna, beginning ‘Clidna Cheindfhind, búan in bét
lv. Áirem muintire Finn
lvi. Fianṡruth
lvii. Lige Guill i mMaig Raigni, lengthy poem on Goll mac Mornai Glinne Garad, attributed to Finn mac Cumaill
Thirteenth and fourteenth centuries
lviii. (a) Acallam na senórach
(b) Acallam bec
lix. The chase of Síd na mBan Finn and the death of Finn

Subcategories

This category has only the following subcategory.

D

Pages in category ‘Finn Cycle’

The following 157 pages are in this category, out of 157 total.

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