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There are currently 1584 catalogue entries on texts.

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  • [Dinnshenchas of Alend]
  • verse beg. Alend óenach diar n-ócaib
  • part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A; Dinnshenchas Érenn C
  • Middle Irish
  • prose; verse
  • 14 st.
  • Short description: Dinnshenchas of Alend
  • In English: ‘The dinnshenchas of Ireland’
  • Middle Irish
  • verse; prose
  • Short description: The Dinnshenchas Érenn is a compilation of literary compositions, in prose or verse, on lore surrounding the prominent places of Ireland. These texts usually offer origin legends which purport to explain how a well-known place in Ireland, such as a certain hill, plain or lake, received its present or former name. The genesis of this collection is usually dated to the late Middle Irish period (11th and 12th centuries).
  • Middle Irish
    • [Dám thrír táncatar ille]
    • verse beg. Dám thrír táncatar ille
    • part of or cited in: Independent; Acallam bec; Agallamh na seanórach
    • Middle Irish
    • verse
      • Short description: The term ‘Ulster Cycle’ is used in modern scholarship to refer to a body of Irish narrative literature set in the heroic age of the Ulaid around the time of Conchobar mac Nessa.
      • [Verba Scáthaige]
      • verse beg. A mbé eirr óengaile
      • part of or cited in: Independent; Tochmarc Emire
      • In English: ‘When you are a peerless champion’
      • Old Irish
      • verse
      • Short description: Poem in the form of a prophecy delivered by Scáthach to Cú Chulainn.
      • Middle Irish
      • verse
      • 28 st.
      • Short description: Poem on the dinnshenchas of Ailech.
      • In English: ‘On the wonders of Ireland’
      • Middle Irish
      • prose
      • Short description: Middle Irish account of certain wonders associated with more than 30 places in Ireland
      • In English: ‘The alphabet of piety / devotion’
      • Ascribed to: Colmán mac Béognae
      • Old Irish; Middle Irish
      • prose
        • In English: ‘The Holy Bible’
        • Short description: In 1690, the Irish translations of the Old and New Testament were published together as An Biobla Naomhtha. The printing of this book, which involved transliteration from Irish into Roman characters, was overseen by Rev. Robert Kirk, who intended it for Scottish Gaelic readers. Kirk’s effort met with little enthusiasm.
        • In English: ‘The stratagem of Urard mac Coise’
        • Authored by:
          Thought to have been authored by...
          Urard mac Coise
        • Ascribed to: Urard mac Coise
        • Middle Irish
        • prose
        • Short description: A Middle Irish saga which relates how the poet Urard/Aurard mac Cosse (fl. 10th/11th century) obtained compensation from Domnall mac Muirchertaig, king of Tara, following a raid on his home. It includes version B of the medieval Irish tale lists.
        • Authored by:
          Thought to have been authored by...
          Lynch (John)
        • Latin language; Neo-Latin
        • prose
          • In English: ‘The violent death of Díarmait mac Cerbaill’
          • prose
          • Short description: A composite Middle Irish tale about the reign and (threefold) death of Díarmait mac Cerbaill, king of Ireland. A common theme is the king’s violation of ecclesiastical sanctuary or protection.
          • Old Irish
          • Short description: The title Senchas Már refers to a collection of law texts which came into being in the Old Irish period.
          • [Aided Úaland]
          • part of or cited in: Táin bó Cúailnge I; Táin bó Cúailnge II
          • In English: ‘The (violent) death of Úalu’
          • prose
          • Short description: A series of episodes found in Táin bó Cúailnge (recensions I and II), in which the river Cronn and one or two other streams rise against the hosts of Connacht, hindering their progress and leading to the death of Úalu and the loss of many more warriors.
          • In English: ‘The (violent) death of Lóthar’
          • prose
          • Short description: Story about the death of Medb’s cowherd Lóthar, with an additional anecdote about the search for the bull. It occurs only in the first recension of TBC.
          • In English: ‘On the confirmation/binding of right and law’
            • In English: ‘If you are a king you should know the prerogative of a ruler’
            • Old Irish
            • verse
            • Short description: Legal poem cited at the end of Críth gablach. It numbers 104 lines in Binchy's edition.
            • In English: ‘The adventures of the sons of Eochaid Muigmedóin’
            • Middle Irish
            • prose
            • Short description: A composite text about Níall Noígíallach, his early life and accession to the kingship of Ireland.
            • list
              • list
                • In English: ‘The reason why Clann Cholmáin and Síl nÁedo Sláine owe tribute to Clonmacnoise’
                  • list
                    • In English: ‘The violent death of the children of Uisneach’
                    • Early Modern Irish
                    • prose; verse; prosimetrum
                      • list
                        • In English: ‘The battle of Aichill’
                        • Early Irish
                        • prose
                        • Short description: Prose narrative about the battle fought by Tuathal Techtmar at Aichill.
                        • list
                          • In English: ‘The slaying of the three sons of Díarmait mac Cerbaill’
                          • Old Irish; Middle Irish
                            • list
                              • In English: ‘Judgements of neighbourhood’
                              • Old Irish
                              • prose
                                • In English: ‘The battle of Mag Rath’
                                • Short description: Early Irish narrative about the battle of Mag Rath
                                • list
                                  • In English: ‘The conception and birth of Mongán and Mongán's love for Dub Lacha’
                                  • prose
                                    • list
                                      • In English: ‘Rank-sections (Passages on rank)’
                                      • Old Irish
                                      • prose
                                        • list
                                          • In English: ‘The destruction of Dind Ríg’
                                          • Old Irish
                                            • In English: ‘The violent death of Diarmait mac Cerbaill’
                                            • Middle Irish
                                            • prose
                                              • list
                                                • Ascribed to: Ailill Ólomm
                                                • Middle Irish
                                                • verse
                                                  • list
                                                    • list
                                                      • list
                                                        • In English: ‘O cross yonder on the hill’
                                                        • Authored by:
                                                          Thought to have been authored by...
                                                          Ó Dálaigh (Gofraidh Fionn)
                                                        • Ascribed to: Ó Dálaigh (Gofraidh Fionn)
                                                        • verse
                                                        • 39 st.
                                                          • list
                                                          • Short description: The opening section in version B of the medieval Irish tale lists and not found in version A. It offers a list of gnáthscéla (miscellaneous tales), many of which refer to individual episodes in Táin bó Cúailnge.
                                                          • Old Irish
                                                          • Short description: An early Irish legal text, of which only one fragment has been identified.
                                                          • In English: ‘The violent death of Conn Cétchathach’
                                                          • Middle Irish
                                                            • In English: ‘The story of Conn, Art and Cormac’
                                                            • Initial words (prose): Righ uasul oirmhidnech oiregda do ghabh flaithemhnus Fodla fecht n-aill
                                                            • Middle Irish; Early Modern Irish
                                                            • prose; verse
                                                              • In English: ‘O King of heaven, clarify to me’
                                                              • Ascribed to: Gilla in Choimded ua Cormaic
                                                              • Middle Irish
                                                              • verse
                                                              • 111 st.
                                                                • Middle Irish
                                                                • verse
                                                                • 8 st.
                                                                • Short description: Poem on the deaths of the seven Maines, sons of Medb and Ailill.


                                                                FURTHER RESULTS…

                                                                • Authored by:
                                                                  Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                  Laidcenn mac Baíth Bannaig
                                                                • Ascribed to: Laidcenn mac Baíth Bannaig
                                                                • Latin language
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: An epitome of Gregory the Great's lengthy commentary on the Book of Job, Moralia in Iob. This abbreviated version is attributed to the 7th-century Irish theologian Laidcenn mac Baíth Bannaig, abbot of Clúain Fertae Mo Lua (Clonfertmulloe), and may have been brought to mainland Europe by Irish peregrini. The work is now extant in a dozen continental manuscripts.
                                                                • Latin language
                                                                • verse
                                                                • Short description: Hiberno-Latin synchronistic poem on the six ages of the world, covering both biblical and classical history. Each line consists of 15 syllables. A detail for which this poem attracted attention is the obit of Domnall rex Scottorum, presumably Domnall mac Áeda (although Domnall Brecc has been suggested as another candidate), in the year 642.
                                                                • Initial words (prose): Ba sanct n-amra inti Senan
                                                                • Middle Irish
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: A Middle Irish preface and epilogue to the poem Amra Senáin ‘The eulogy of Senán’ mac Geirrcinn, abbot and saint of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island, Co. Clare), in two parts: (1) a short miracle story which relates how Senán delivered an artisan named Nárach from a monster inhabiting the estuary of the Shannon in which the river island is located, and (2) a short passage, directly before and after the poem (except in NLI MS G 30), attributing the poem to Dallán Forgaill. The first part seemingly derives from a version of the story as it is told in the Commentary to Félire Óengusso (8 March). Both versions take their cue from a reading of two lines in the Félire (Senan Indse Cathaig / crochais écrait n-árach ‘Senán of Inis Cathaig / disabled the enemy with a binding’, for which see Breatnach’s text and translation). The tale of Senán’s encounter is expanded, if without mention of Nárach, in Betha Shenáin.
                                                                • In English: ‘The life of Senán mac Geirrcinn’
                                                                • Early Modern Irish
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: Vernacular Irish Life of St Senán of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island).
                                                                • Short description: A collection of dinnshenchas articles, much of it in prose, that is uniquely attested in RIA MS D ii 2 (ff. 81v-90r), where it occurs as a supplement to a copy of Dinnshenchas Érenn (recension C). Many items are unique to this manuscript, while some of the material appears to have been derived from other texts, such as Tochmarc Emire, Lebor gabála Érenn and Cath Maige Mucrama, and even other recensions of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
                                                                • Irish language
                                                                • verse
                                                                • Short description: Irish poem (7qq) apparently concerning Emain Macha and Cimbáeth. It is found in NLI MS G 7, where it is prefaced with a short prose introduction (beg. Toforaint in Márrighan laithriuch nduine lie hAulta hi Machi) referring to the the dinnshenchas for Emain Macha. Editions, translations and discussions in secondary literature are unknown at this stage.
                                                                • Ascribed to: Úa Duinn (Gilla na Náem)
                                                                • Late Middle Irish
                                                                • verse
                                                                • Short description: Long poem attributed in various manuscript copies to Gilla na Náem Úa Duinn.
                                                                • Ascribed to: Úa Duinn (Gilla na Náem)
                                                                • Late Middle Irish
                                                                • verse
                                                                • 121 st.
                                                                • Short description: A long poem (121 qq) giving a précis of the Dinnshenchas Érenn and included at the end of the version of that collection in the Book of Uí Maine. The last stanza attributes the poem to Gilla na Náem Úa Duinn and gives the year 1166.
                                                                • Ascribed to: Id:Flann Mainistrech
                                                                • Middle Irish
                                                                • verse
                                                                • Short description: Medieval Irish poem attributed to Flann Mainistrech on the destruction of Troy. Mac Eoin believed it to have been based on a prose text concerning the Trojan war but not a text of Togail Troí as we know it today.
                                                                • Ascribed to: Úa Sesnáin (Colmán)
                                                                • Late Middle Irish
                                                                • Short description: Irish poem attributed to Colmán Úa Sesnáin on the prehistoric kings who ruled in Emain Macha, from Conchobar mac Nessa onwards.
                                                                • Late Middle Irish
                                                                • verse
                                                                • Short description: Anonymous Irish poem on the Christian kings of Ulster, thought by F. J. Fyrne to have been written in the reign of Eochaidh Mac Duinnshléibhe (1158-1166).
                                                                • Initial words (prose): In nomine Dei summi
                                                                • Old Irish
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: Short prose homily in Old Irish and Latin, which has been dated as early as the 7th or the first half of the 8th century and on that account, has some claim to being the earliest specimen of Old Irish in continuous prose. The text has been frequently cited for its linguistic features and for its account of three forms of martyrdom categorised according to colour: white (bán), blue/green (glas) and red (derc).
                                                                • Initial words (prose): Atlochomar buidi do Dia uile-cumachtach
                                                                • Old Irish
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: Old Irish prose homily (beg. Atlochomar buidi do Dia uile-cumachtach)
                                                                • Initial words (prose): Tri hollamain Chondacht .i. mac Liacc 7 mac Coisi 7 Fland mac Lonain .i. mac De 7 mac duine 7 mac deamain
                                                                • Irish language
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: Short Irish prose tale about three poets of Connacht, Mac Liac, Mac Coise and Flann mac Lonáin. The text occurs in the Yellow Book of Lecan by way of a preface to the verse Dinnshenchas of Slíab nEchtga II attr. to Flann and follows another prose introduction about and poem attributed to Flann (Bó bithblicht meic Lonán).
                                                                • Initial words (prose): Laithe n-aen dia rabadar treis gnía léigind
                                                                • Irish language
                                                                • prose
                                                                • Short description: Short Irish prose tale, which has been edited by Meyer as an example of bérla na filed.
                                                                • Early Middle Irish; Late Old Irish
                                                                • verse
                                                                • Short description: Religious poem (8 qq)
                                                                • Old Irish
                                                                  • Authored by:
                                                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                    Dungal of Saint-Denis
                                                                  • Ascribed to: Baldo of Salzburg
                                                                  • Latin language
                                                                  • verse
                                                                  • Short description: Carolingian Latin poem written by Dungal (l. 3) and addressed to a certain Baldo magister.
                                                                  • Authored by:
                                                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                    Hibernicus Exul
                                                                  • Ascribed to: Hibernicus Exul
                                                                  • Latin language
                                                                  • verse
                                                                  • Short description: Latin poem addressed to Charlemagne and reflecting on his conflict with Tassilo III, duke of Bavary, whom he deposed in 788. The poem is preserved, in fragmentary form (103 hexametrical lines), in a single manuscript (Vatican, BAV, MS Reg. lat. 2078) and was written by an anonymous Irishman known from the heading as Hibernicus Exul.
                                                                  • Latin language
                                                                  • prose
                                                                  • Short description: Latin Life of St Brynach (Lat. Bernachius). BHL 1186.
                                                                  • In English: ‘The history of Gruffudd ap Cynan’
                                                                  • Middle Welsh
                                                                  • prose
                                                                  • Short description: Middle Welsh translation of an earlier Latin biography of the life and career of Gruffudd ap Cynan, king of Gwynedd (r. 1081-1137).
                                                                  • Early Modern Irish
                                                                  • Short description: Irish Life of St Catherine of Alexandria
                                                                  • Authored by:
                                                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                    Ó Neachtain (Tadhg)
                                                                  • Modern Irish
                                                                  • prose
                                                                  • Short description: Glosses by Tadhg Tiorthach Ó Neachtain to Trecheng breth Féne (Triads of Ireland) in Dublin, Trinity College, MS 1289 (c. 1745).
                                                                  • Short description: A brief set of Irish annals, running from the reign of Laegaire to AD 1134 and thought to be of Armagh provenance.
                                                                  • Initial words (prose): Is hé titul fil i n-dreich ind libuir se taitni do menmanaib inna légnide
                                                                  • Old Irish
                                                                  • prose
                                                                    • Latin language; Old Irish
                                                                    • Short description: Latin and some Irish glosses on computus in Vat. lat. 5755.
                                                                    • In English: ‘The prose ‘Lore of women’’
                                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                                    • prose
                                                                    • Short description: Prose version of the Banshenchas
                                                                    • In English: ‘The metrical ‘Lore of women’’
                                                                    • Authored by:
                                                                      Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                      Úa Caiside (Gilla Mo Dutu)
                                                                    • Ascribed to: Úa Caiside (Gilla Mo Dutu)
                                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                                    • Short description: Metrical version of the Banshenchas, composed by Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside (1147)
                                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                                    • Short description: A Middle Irish short story about a dialogue between Brénainn of Clonfert with one of his successors, Moínenn, bishop of Clonfert, on the subject of death and the afterlife.
                                                                    • In English: ‘The history of the Lombards’
                                                                    • Early Modern Irish
                                                                    • prose
                                                                    • Short description: A 15th-century Irish translation, probably of chapter 19 (‘De sancto Pelagio papa’) from Jacobus de Voragine’s hagiographic compilation Legenda aurea (1260 x 1270).
                                                                    • Authored by:
                                                                      Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                      Ua Brolcháin (Máel Ísu)
                                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                                    • verse
                                                                    • 9 st.
                                                                    • Short description: Metrical invocation (9qq, treochair) of Michael the archangel.
                                                                    • In English: ‘The rule of Ailbe of Emly’
                                                                    • Old Irish
                                                                    • verse
                                                                    • 56 st.
                                                                    • Short description: Old Irish monastic rule in metrical form
                                                                    • Early Irish
                                                                    • prose; list
                                                                    • Short description: List of Irish saints classified as deacons (diacones). It is closely associated in the manuscripts with two similar lists of saints who have been bishops or priests.
                                                                    • Early Irish
                                                                    • prose; list
                                                                    • Short description: List of 277 Irish saints classified as priests (sacerdotes). It is closely associated in the manuscripts with two similar lists of saints who have been bishops or deacons.
                                                                    • Early Irish
                                                                    • prose; list
                                                                    • Short description: List of 292 Irish saints classified as bishops. It is associated in the manuscripts with two similar lists of saints who have been priests or deacons.
                                                                    • Early Modern Irish
                                                                    • prose
                                                                    • Short description: Vernacular Irish translation of the Latin Life of St Declán of Ardmore (Vita sancti Declani).
                                                                    • Early Irish
                                                                    • verse
                                                                    • 1 st.
                                                                    • Short description: A specimen of early Irish verse cited in the Latin Life of St Declán of Ardmore (Vita sancti Declani § 21) and the later, vernacular version of the same saint (Betha Decclain).
                                                                    • Latin language
                                                                    • prose
                                                                    • Short description: Latin vita of Declán of Ardmore
                                                                    • Early Irish
                                                                    • prose; list
                                                                    • Short description: Early Irish tract containing lists of female Irish saints (nóebúag ‘holy virgins’) of the same name. In the manuscripts, the text immediately follows that of a similar tract known as Comainmnigud nóem nÉrenn.
                                                                    • Early Irish
                                                                    • prose; list
                                                                    • Short description: Early Irish tract containing lists of Irish saints of the same name. Most copies of the text are followed by a similar tract focusing on female Irish ‘holy virgins’ (Comanmand nóebúag hÉrenn).
                                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                                    • verse
                                                                      • Middle Irish
                                                                      • prose; prosimetrum
                                                                      • Short description: The Middle Irish commentary which accompanies manuscript texts of the Félire Óengusso.
                                                                      • Ascribed to: Úa hUathgaile (Dublittir)
                                                                      • Middle Irish
                                                                      • verse
                                                                      • Short description: Middle Irish poem attributed to Dublittir Úa hUathgaile (fl. late 11th century), fer léigin at Glen Uissen, now Killeshin. It is attested both as the concluding poem in the Sex aetates mundi and in independent manuscript contexts.
                                                                      • In English: ‘Concerning sacred places’
                                                                      • Authored by:
                                                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                        Adomnán
                                                                      • Ascribed to: Adomnán
                                                                      • Latin language
                                                                      • prose
                                                                      • Short description: Account by Adomnán, abbot of Iona, on the holy places of the East, based on a travel account by Gaulish monk Arculf. It was presented to King Aldfrith, king of Northumbria, in 698.
                                                                      • Middle Irish
                                                                      • prose
                                                                      • Short description: Middle Irish, abridged version of Bede’s De locis sanctis
                                                                      • Ascribed to: Byrhtferth of Ramsey
                                                                      • Latin language
                                                                      • diagram; prose
                                                                      • Short description: Elaborate diagram of the ‘harmony of the months and elements’, which once occupied a single page in a largely computistical manuscript compiled by Byrhtferth of Ramsey (c. 970–c. 1020). The original of this compilation is lost, but two independent ‘copies’ made in the early 12th century remain. The diagram aligns different aspects of time (solstice, equinox, months, seasons, ages of man), the zodiac and the four elements, and in this way, introduces a number of key concepts relevant to computus. In the Oxford manuscript, the diagram comes right at the end of a section (ff. 3r-7v) which contains a miscellaneous variety of short texts and visual designs related to computus, and directly precedes another section (ff. 8r-15v) containing tables and texts on computus.
                                                                      • In English: ‘Recreation for an emperor’
                                                                      • Authored by:
                                                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                        Gervase of Tilbury
                                                                      • Latin language
                                                                      • prose
                                                                      • Short description: Encyclopaedic work written by the English jurist and cleric Gervase of Tilbury. It was dedicated to Emperor Otto IV and intended for his instruction and entertainment, although it is unclear if he ever heard or read the work. The work is divided into three books or decisiones: book I covers the early history of the world, from Creation onwards; book II offers a historical geography of the world (mappa mundi) and its provinces, with excursions on the Holy Land and the six ages of the world. While anecdotal material, including legends about marvels (mirabilia), is found throughout the first two books, book III is entirely devoted to marvellous phenomena.
                                                                      • Ascribed to: Patricius
                                                                      • Latin language
                                                                      • verse
                                                                      • Short description: Latin poem on the wonders of Ireland, attributed to a certain Patricius, who has been identified with Patrick (Gilla Pátraic), bishop of Dublin.
                                                                      • Initial words (prose): Lá n-áen robátar muintear Clúana a n-oireachtus for urrlár na cille
                                                                      • Early Modern Irish
                                                                      • prose
                                                                      • Short description: Narrative anecdote in prose based on one of the wonders in De ingantaib Érenn.
                                                                      • Authored by:
                                                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                                                        Alcuin
                                                                      • Latin language
                                                                      • prose
                                                                      • Short description: Alcuin’s revised version of the vita of Richarius (Ricquier), an early 7th-century Frankish nobleman and founder of the monastery of Centula (Saint-Riquier, Picardy).


                                                                      FURTHER RESULTS…

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